02
Jul 14

Can a font save the planet?

From SNDS Magazine no. 2, 2014

R Eco poster_chosen V4

“The last printing revolution changed our world. This one could help save it.”

Ambitions are high for British stationary brand Ryman and ad agency Grey London, who recently released a new font, Ryman Eco.

Ryman claims that its new font, which is available for free download, uses a third less ink and toner than standard fonts such as Arial, Times New Roman, and Verdana. The company believes that if everyone used the new font, it would save over 490 million ink cartridges and could help lower CO2 emissions by over 6.5 million tons.

The font was designed using thin lines rather than solid shapes, which reduces the amount of printer toner used to form a letter on the printed document. Ryman Eco was designed to be suitable for use in any context, at any size, and this is perhaps the biggest challenge to its success. The idea is that in small sizes, you may not even notice the white lines in the characters, but in larger sizes its decorative appearance may mean some organisations may not want to use it in their publications. Furthermore, companies or organisations with a distinct design policy are not likely to use this font anywhere at all as part of their typographic setup.

Ryman Eco is not the first example of a sustainable font. In 2008, Dutch company SPRANQ released its Eco Font type family, which uses holes in letters to reduce ink waste. But “Ryman Eco is both more efficient […] and more aesthetically pleasing than its rivals,” says the font’s designer Dan Rhatigan and Grey ECD Nils Leonard, in an interview with Creative Review.
However, being aesthetically pleasing – or, as Ryman boasts, “The world’s most beautiful sustainable font” – does not make it suitable for everything. As some commentators note, perhaps Ryman Eco is just an advertising gimmick in order to sell more printer toner – a main product at Ryman’s. 

Download Ryman Eco for free at rymaneco.co.uk

ecofont

Taking the idea of saving toner one step further, the company behind Ecofont Vera Sans has developed software that will put holes in commonly used typefaces such as Verdana and Arial on your computer.

Download Ecofont Vera Sans for free at ecofont.com


25
Jun 14

Time – creativity’s best friend

Editors’ column in SNDS Magazine no. 2, 2014

“Time – he’s waiting in the wings
He speaks of senseless things
His script is you and me, boy …”

– David Bowie (Aladdin Sane, 1973)

In this place we have previously quoted some of the great masters of the advertising business. Sir John Hegarty* is one such master and shares his words of wisdom in a small book, Hegarty on Creativity – There Are No Rules, just published by Thames & Hudson.

In fifty witty chapters he writes about creativity – how to inspire it, how to sustain and perfect it, and how to make a living from it. Creativity is not an occupation, he says, it’s a pre­occupation. So his views touch far beyond the advertising world – and they are certainly relevant for the news business.

“Time may be one of creativity’s best friends, yet no one will give you any. You have to earn it”, Hegarty says.

SNDSmag2-2014-cover-96dpi

Cover image by Lucy McRae and Johan Renck

We live in a world today where tomorrow is too late – and the tight deadlines force you to make snap judgments and rapid decisions which often lead to poor work.

“The ability to stand back from your thinking and give it what we call ‘the overnight test’ is essential. […] To gauge if your idea will stand up to scrutiny necessitates reflection. Thanks to digital technology everything in this world has sped up drastically but that only makes it all that much more important to slow it down. Our brains still operate in an analog world.”

Hegarty has a point here. Although some of us actually work best under some kind of pressure (be it from deadlines, well-meaning bosses or the need to earn money to pay the rent) it’s important to include time enough to let your idea grow.

In SNDS Magazine no. 2, 2012 the Swedish photographer Tor Johnsson said that his most important tool is time – “time to wait for the right picture, the right atmosphere to give justice to the motive”.

Time is also an important aspect of the many new longread formats that more and more news sites are launching next to their quick news feeds. Research show that people are actually prepared to spend a large amount of time on in-depth stories online – but these take time to produce.

Do you get the time you need to make your projects develop to their full potential? Or, if you’re a manager – do you allow your staff enough time to get the work done properly? If your answer is yes! then I will worry no more, and speak no more of senseless things.

Kill the routine
Another way to keep your creativity alive is not to get stuck in the routines of your workday. It happens to all of us – coming into the office at the same time each morning, drinking your usual cups of coffee etc.

“If each day is business as usual how can you possibly create something un­usual?” Hegarty asks, and he’s got another point there.

His first easy step to break the monotony is to simply switch desks with a colleague (if you work in a newsroom with free seating, this is really easy – just pick a new seat each morning). Just by moving across the room, you’re already looking at things from a different perspective.

If you really want to change habits, move to another city – or to another continent. This may, of course, involve some practicalities, but relocating even for a month or two can be really stimulating – having just spent the month of May in Iceland is our personal proof of that.

In the mag
The Fu2i0n14 conference is only four months away, and the program is shaping up. You can meet the first of a long list of great speakers on the next pages and more will be added to the line-up on the conference website at www.fusion.snds.org .

The spectacular cover photo for this issue of SNDS Magazine was created by one of the Fu2ion14 speakers, artist Lucy McRae with photographer Johan Renck. McRae built a coat hanger construction in seven layers with what she calls a ‘paper pixel representation’ of the pop icon Robyn for her Body Talk album. We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to run this extraordinary photo on our cover and look forward to see more of McRae’s work on Fu2i0n14 in Copenhagen.

Photography is the subject for “That Scandinavian something” about the Norwegian photo festival DOK; we get an amazing look into the large pop-up book collection of Professor Michael Stoll, Augsburg University of Applied Sciences; we look behind the scenes of a Swedish experiment with print formats; Ole Munk reviews a new printed newspaper for kids; and k.dk was given a new design and a gold medal, all within the same month.

Enjoy it all, have a great summer – and don’t forget: If you have ideas for stories we should print in the magazine, give us a hint.

Lisbeth Tolstrup & Lars Pryds
Editors, SNDS Magazine

* Sir John Hegarty is founding Creative Partner of Bartle Bogle Hegarty (BBH), one of the world’s most awarded advertising agencies.

.


21
Mar 14

SNDS Magazine no. 1, 2014

SNDSmag1-2014_coverLOREZ“It’s a very interactive piece on a flat medium, not a newspaper trying to be something else…
– SND35 Long-form judges*

Continue reading →


11
Mar 14

Too strong for Facebook and Issuu

snds-magazine-fjernet-fra-facebook

The Society for News Design Scandinavia’s Facebook page has, among other great stuff, a photo album showing all the covers of the organisation’s quarterly publication, SNDS Magazine. We are pretty proud of this long series of covers – witness of the variety of subjects covered on the inside pages. Print and digital news design, the conferences, the competitions, great photography, and art.

Continue reading →


16
Dec 13

SNDS Magazine 4|2013

Our editors’ column in SNDS Magazine 4, 2013.

“I would feel unarmed attacking a day of creative thinking if I hadn’t read The New York Times early that morning.” – George Lois, 2012*

SNDSmag4-2013_pageoneAdvertising guru George Lois (born 1931, inventor of Big Idea advertising) may belong to a different time than the new breed of media workers, who grew up with twitter, blogs, and Facebook. But he sure has made his mark in the graphic design world, creating great art direction for Esquire Magazine, MTV, and Tommy Hilfiger to name a few.

In his small book, Damn Good Advice (for people with talent) he gives some of his experience back to the next generation of creatives – in the form of short, in-your-face advice on how to be creative. His book includes the statement above – followed by this comment:

Continue reading →


14
Nov 13

Recommended: Web-only type book

butterick1

From SNDS Magazine 3|2013

A web-based book about typography – for print and web. Typographer-turned-lawyer Matthew Butterick, who has been at the forefront of developing both type and web design (see for instance typo.la/bitg) created Butterick’s Practical Typography as an ex­per­i­ment in tak­ing the web se­ri­ous­ly as a book-pub­lish­ing medi­um. The book is actually an online version of a book that will never exist in print – but with a lev­el of writ­ing and de­sign qual­i­ty that you’d find in a print­ed book.

Continue reading →