From SNDS Magazine

Articles published in or information about SNDS Magazine, published by Society for News Design Scandinavia

Speaking at the SNDSF workshop in San Francisco, 9 April 2016. Photo by Nina Pryds

10 good reasons why print will not die

Speaking at the SNDSF workshop in San Francisco, 9 April 2016. Photo by Nina Pryds
Speaking at the SNDSF workshop in San Francisco, 9 April 2016. Photo by Nina Pryds

.

Just had the pleasure of doing a pecha kucha at the “SNDSF Evolving our Craft” workshop and exhibition in San Francisco, organized by the Society for News Design. My topic was “10 good reasons why print will not die” – with examples pricked among the latest ten years of winners in the Best of Scandinavian News Design competition.

You can download the pdf with my 20 slides here:

 pryds.com/pryds_sndsf.pdf

decorrespondenten

A calm garden of news

decorrespondenten

Run from a former art gallery in Amsterdam, De Correspondent aims to move away from the daily news cycle by focussing on context, rather than what happened in the past 24 hours

From SNDS Magazine 1, 2016

.

Launched in 2013 following a record-breaking crowdfunding campaign that raised $1.7m, Netherlands-based De Correspondent now has over 45,000 paying subscribers.

De Correspondent currently has an editorial staff of 30, including 14 fulltime journalists, plus a network of 22 contributing correspondents.

Rather than trying to catch up with the usual news flow, the expectation is that readers will follow a particular correspondent who collaborate with the communities around them.

Founding Editor-in-chief Rob Wijnberg says that when other media claim to be reporting “the news” there will always be thousands of other stories to be told. De Corres­pondent aims to let their reporters tell these stories on the publication’s website, which was designed by digital creative agency Momkai, featuring a custom-made cms  called Respondens.

The mission
Each journalist has a particular area or ‘garden’ on the website – sections of the site they can call their own, and in which they can build a relationship with readers who choose to ‘follow’ them.

“De Correspondent has a stated mission of establishing a lasting relationship with the readers, who are also asked to contribute their expertise on the topics, the correspondents cover,” says Stine Carsten Kendal, Director for development at iBureauet, a media company owned by Danish newspaper Information.

She thinks that Scandinavian media can learn from the Dutch startup:

“Information is inspired by all the new things going on in the exciting world of journalism. In Holland, journalists, designers and web developers worked together to create the new platform and cms for the online journalism, and everything is thoroughly designed to invite the readers to participate. They call them ‘members’ to stress the inclusion and particip­ation of the readers. The new media platform is also kept ad free, which I know is something all designers enjoy!”

stine-quote

Spaces of calm
However, the decision to make the publication completely ad free is not to please designers, although this is a nice touch, but rather to give the readers a special environment for reading. Creative Director Harald Dunnink compares the spaces on the De Correspondent website to rooms in a welldesigned art museum:

“The museum affords me a calm space where I can focus on the works of others. This is an idea that ties in seamlessly with our approach at Momkai and The Correspondent. In the fragmented real time of digital media, we are bombarded by images and messages non-stop. Rarely do we tune out this background noise long enough to listen attentively to a single, solitary message. Our mission therefore, as I see it, is to create online spaces of calm.”

In a recent article he describes the basic principles for succeeding with this philosophy (see bit.ly/cultivatingcalm).

Openness to readers
Stine Carsten Kendal visited De Correspondent in 2015 when they were expanding their staff and were thrilled that their initial succes with crowdfunding was continuing.

“I was introduced to De Correspondent through Cathrine Gyllensted, a Danish specialist in constructive journalism, who has just been appointed director for constructive journalism at a Dutch journalism school. By communicating very professionally about their succes, De Correspondent has received international attention. I think it is also due to the simplicity of their site, design and message. Another thing I like is how they use infographics to show how they spend the membership fees, to show their responsibility towards their readers and their openness,” Stine Carsten Kendal says.

“One of the issues De Correspondent has raised, is how to qualify comments and debate following the journalism. They work both with the cms and with active participation by the journalists, and also with little triggers like pointing out some members as specialists or experts and showing their comments more prominently. They also make it possible to add notes to the article for further reading, without interrupting the flow with links.”

Synergy in publishing
In today’s multi-layered media landscape, it’s not enough to focus on a single outlet or on just reporting the news. It’s important also to reach out to readers on other platforms and through other media:

“To me, it is interesting that this new online only journalism organisation publishes a book, sets up an art exhibition and arranges public meetings. It shows that the synergy between different kinds of publishing is also important in a digital first world,” says Stine Carsten Kendal.

“So much interesting is going on right now with online media that I cannot wait to see what the future brings.”

.

Sources/Read more:

De Correspondent:
decorrespondent.nl

Dutch journalism platform the Correspondent reaches milestone of 40,000 paying members:
bit.ly/corresmile

De Correspondent on Medium:
medium.com/de-correspondent

Cultivating calm: a design
philosophy for the digital age:
bit.ly/cultivatingcalm

SNDSmag_1_2016-cover

It’s all worthwhile

SNDSmag_1_2016-cover

Editor’s column from SNDS Magazine 1, 2016

There’s a starman
waiting in the sky
He’s told us not to blow it
Cause he knows
it’s all worthwhile

– David Bowie: “Starman” (1972)

In the first week of March, I had the pleasure once again of spending days in Legoland, attending the judging of entries in this year’s Scandinavian news design competition. Among my duties was to help with photographing all the print winners for the annual catalogue.

The jury looks at only the real original printed pages “as they were delivered to your readers”, as the competition guidelines demand. Preparing the pages for photograping, therefore, is a painstakingly analogue process, which involves a lot of work finding the pages to include in the book (large article series in, say, the feature category can amount to 20 spreads or more which is impossible to fit in), fixing the pages on cardboard by means of a lot Spray Mount – and removing the pages again to keep for reference, when the jury has to make the final decision.

This is not a one-man job. Long time member of the competition committee Søren Stidsholt Nielsen (see photo left, with me) and our photographer Lars Aarø also inhale their sweet share of Spray Mount during a whole day, and it’s really not all that healthy – it definitely makes you feel all sticky inside.

But it’s all worthwhile. We laugh a lot, comment on the judges’ choices all the time, look for lovely legs and beautiful girls in the winning pages (this year, there were not that many), but above all we get to see a lot of great design. This is, of course, also a treat for the judges – and they see even more, because they also look at pages that do NOT win.

One print jury member, graphic designer Rina Kjeldgaard said: “I’ll be looking at my own work now with a completely new set of eyes. And I have a better understanding of which of my own newspaper’s pages are winners, and which aren’t. All from watching so many great pages.”

The same goes for the digital jury – although they need no Spray Mount to make screendumps of the winners. Looking through hundreds of design solutions is a great inspiration.

On pages 6–11, we bring you a glimpse from the judging process in Billund, in photos as well as in comments from the jury members on what they observed during their hard work.

Also in this issue
So it really is all worthwhile, as David Bowie sang in “Starman” back in 1972. The British rock ’n’ roll legend died in January – and for once, it was a cultural event (although a sad one, for us Bowie fans) that made newspapers all over the world clear their front pages. We asked design consultants Maj Ribergård and Ole Munk to rate (using black stars, of course) some of the magnificent visual tributes to the musical pioneer and mega star. See them in the back of the magazine, on pages 26–30.

But – before you reach the magazine’s final pages, we have done our best to collect a nice bouquet of interesting stuff for you. We hope you will enjoy a mix of stories from the real world of print and online news publishing, including the redesign of the Finnish newspaper HBL and a Dutch startup for online only journalism, as well as thoughts about the future of the internet and impressions from a print designer in a digital competition. And much more … in other words, things for the eyes and for the mind.

On a final note in this column we ask you to mark the dates 13–14 October 2016 in your calendar, as these are the days when the next SNDS conference will take place, and it will be in – ta-da – Malmö! The SNDS conference visited Malmö once before, back in 2002. Now, after four consecutive years in Copenhagen, we’re looking so much forward to be back in the cosy international centre of Southern Sweden.

We sincerely hope to see you all there. Until then – stay cool and creative and make it all worthwhile.

Lars Pryds
Editor, SNDS Magazine

 

snd_designjournal_2015-1_

“Passion wears many hats”

From SNDS Magazine no. 4, 2015.

The SND Design Journal is back – stronger than ever

By the time you read this, SND will have published the 114th issue of the Design Journal and mailed it to its members. Except for the special How 2 issue in the summer of 2013, it’s been three years since the latest issue of the journal, so it has been a long time.

snd_designjournal_2015-1_But it was worth the wait. Subtitled The Passion Issue, all contributors focus on this driving force:

“We love it when we have it. And when it’s missing, we long for it, again. […] We look at the many facets of this powerful emotion and how it has a hold on us all,” as the editor, SND Publications Director Julie M. Elman says in the introduction.

Læs more

Look for the flowers

Editorial, SNDS Magazine no. 4, December 2015.

“There are flowers everywhere, for those who bother to look.”

– Henri Matisse (1869–1954)

In this issue of SNDS Magazine we look back at the two first days of October, when 113 people gathered in Copenhagen for the SNDS15 news design conference. The number of participants was higher than previous years, so maybe we can look forward to a growing interest in getting together with your colleagues and get inspiration for your daily work at home (see p. 8–13). Læs more